Strawberry Farm – Strawberry Fields Storytellers http://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/ Mon, 07 Aug 2023 12:14:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.3.1 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Strawberry Farm – Strawberry Fields Storytellers http://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/ 32 32 Total rainfall hurts Baldwin County farmers https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/total-rainfall-hurts-baldwin-county-farmers/ Mon, 07 Aug 2023 12:14:06 +0000 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/total-rainfall-hurts-baldwin-county-farmers/ Total rainfall hurts Baldwin County farmersBALDWIN COUNTY, Alabama (WKRG) — It’s no secret that farmers depend on rain, but lately there’s been plenty in Baldwin County. “You’re looking at tens of millions of dollars in harvests we stand to lose a bunch of money. It’s just a disaster here right now,” Jeremy Sessions said. Flash flooding causes traffic backups in […]]]> Total rainfall hurts Baldwin County farmers

BALDWIN COUNTY, Alabama (WKRG) — It’s no secret that farmers depend on rain, but lately there’s been plenty in Baldwin County.

“You’re looking at tens of millions of dollars in harvests we stand to lose a bunch of money. It’s just a disaster here right now,” Jeremy Sessions said.

Parts of Baldwin County received nearly a foot of rain this month alone, nearly double the average for a typical August. This is hurting farmers who are struggling this month, especially those trying to grow cotton, peanuts, corn and pecans.

“These effects are going to be felt in the fall, at Christmas, at Thanksgiving. Those pecan candies that people like to have from local farms, the quality is going to be affected,” Sessions added.

At the Burris Farm Market in Loxley, longtime owner and farmer Greg Burris is already looking ahead to October. That’s when he plants strawberries that should be ready to pick in January. This is the typical pattern, but this year high rainfall totals could affect that.

“I have to go to the field to prepare the ground. October is coming fast,” Burris said.

Burris says rain has affected work on the farm since June. “We have manpower that we have to keep busy working or we lose it,” he added.

It’s a sentiment shared by other farmers who say they’re doing their best to stay busy until it dries out, but in the meantime they’re losing money.

“We try to focus on our equipment, working in the barns, trying to work on projects, doing preventative maintenance on our equipment and getting things ready, so in case he tries and we can get into the fields, we’ll be ready to roll,” added Sessions.

Stay ahead of the biggest stories, breaking news and weather in Mobile, Pensacola and the Gulf Coast and Alabama. Download the WKRG News 5 news app and make sure to enable push alerts.

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COMMENT: Retain the character of the house https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/comment-retain-the-character-of-the-house/ https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/comment-retain-the-character-of-the-house/#respond Mon, 07 Aug 2023 08:56:33 +0000 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/comment-retain-the-character-of-the-house/ [ad_1] Update (09/17/21): Due to bad weather, the dedication ceremony to rename Mukai Way has been postponed to a later date. What distinguishes one community or neighborhood from another? Perhaps a name, for example “Little Italy” or “Quartier international”. Or maybe a street, “les Champs-Elysée” or “Canal Street”. The name immediately evokes a neighborhood, a […]]]>


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Update (09/17/21): Due to bad weather, the dedication ceremony to rename Mukai Way has been postponed to a later date.

What distinguishes one community or neighborhood from another? Perhaps a name, for example “Little Italy” or “Quartier international”. Or maybe a street, “les Champs-Elysée” or “Canal Street”. The name immediately evokes a neighborhood, a boulevard, a city, or the experience one has lived there.

Preserving the identity of a place is not easy. Walk through Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood today and it’s hard to find the Troll or the Lenin Statue among the banks and high-tech corporate buildings that line the canal. Where is the trendy district with the Greek restaurant and the hippie shops?

Change is inevitable whether or not it is progress. But the character of a place can be preserved by making a conscious effort to do so. Friends of Mukai did this by working with King County Council to establish “Mukai Way†to honor the Mukai family. He recognizes the Mukai Farm and Garden of Historic Significance on 107th Ave SW. It joins many other places on the island that capture who we once were, but still cherish to this day.

Many years ago, when I was a child, my mother worked with other Islanders and the County to preserve the existing historic street names on Vashon. It was at this point that our rural road addresses were replaced with King County street grid addresses. Mother didn’t want to turn our street into an SW number instead of Cowan Rd. She wanted to preserve what was distinctive about the Vashon Island community – our history.

And what names have been preserved!

Chemin Lisabeula was named by a Vashon postmaster named Brink, for his two daughters, Eliza and Beulah. Reddings Beach Road. is named after the Reddings family, who settled there in 1884. And who knew that the name Tahlequah was chosen in a name contest in 1920 for the new South End ferry dock? The winner of the contest, a young woman from Burton, proposed to name the wharf after the city of Oklahoma which is the capital of the Cherokee Nation. She thought the word Cherokee meant “water view”. It is not, but the view is still beautiful from Tahlequah, all the same.

From now on, Mukai Way will pay homage to the Japanese immigrant Mukai family, who operated a hugely successful strawberry farm and keg factory from the 1910s to the 1950s. It is the first honorary street designation on Vashon to recognize the many Japanese-American fruit and vegetable growing families who settled here in the early 1900s, only to be exiled and imprisoned during WWII.

They deserve to be recognized for their cultural and economic contribution to a place called Vashon Island.

Kay Longhi is a member of the Friends of Mukai board of directors and grew up on the island.


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How Hurricane Ida hurt farmers: destroyed barns, crumbling crops and thousands of gallons of milk lost | Livingston / Tangipahoa https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/how-hurricane-ida-hurt-farmers-destroyed-barns-crumbling-crops-and-thousands-of-gallons-of-milk-lost-livingston-tangipahoa/ https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/how-hurricane-ida-hurt-farmers-destroyed-barns-crumbling-crops-and-thousands-of-gallons-of-milk-lost-livingston-tangipahoa/#respond Sat, 05 Aug 2023 17:38:16 +0000 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/how-hurricane-ida-hurt-farmers-destroyed-barns-crumbling-crops-and-thousands-of-gallons-of-milk-lost-livingston-tangipahoa/ [ad_1] As residents of Tangipahoa Parish took shelter in place as Hurricane Ida struck, Susie and Harrell Sharkey worried about their cows. The Sharkeys have been in the dairy industry for over 40 years – one of many declining milk suppliers in the state. Their 110 dairy cows have to be milked twice a day, […]]]>


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As residents of Tangipahoa Parish took shelter in place as Hurricane Ida struck, Susie and Harrell Sharkey worried about their cows.

The Sharkeys have been in the dairy industry for over 40 years – one of many declining milk suppliers in the state. Their 110 dairy cows have to be milked twice a day, and as the 2 a.m. feeding approached during the storm, a piece of their pump broke.

There was no way for the serviceman to reach them due to the many trees that had fallen near their Kentwood area farm, so Darrell ended up walking the 10 miles to get the part himself.

However, the cows were only milked around noon, increasing their stress levels and affecting their milk production. All in all, at the end of the day, Susie estimates that they have lost 1,000 pounds of milk.

“I have had six barns affected,†she said. “Only one was not beheaded. My nephew, he lost two cows. A tree hit them. It’s just one thing after another.”

The $ 10,000 worth of hay bought before the storm and stored in a barn? Moldy and ruined by the rain after the roof was ripped off. The trees that crisscrossed the roads hampered the milk truck. Feeding of cattle, for a time, was scarce. Many fences were badly damaged.

“It’s been a stressful time trying to do ten things at once,†said Harrell.

After the remnants of Hurricane Nicholas dumped up to 6 inches of rain over parts of southeastern Louisiana after weakening to a tropical depression …

As residents of Tangipahoa Parish cover their roofs and pack their generators, farmers in the area struggle to manage their farms while dealing with the myriad of problems Ida caused.

Many have felt pressure similar to that of the Sharkeys over the past three weeks and fear they will be left behind in the midst of recovery efforts.

Julie Hutchinson, who also runs a dairy farm near Kentwood, had to make her way to their barn at 4 a.m. during the hurricane because they had no choice but to milk their cows . If cows are not milked on a schedule, the quality and production of their milk can suffer, leaving farmers in a financial bind.

She knows farmers who had to dump their milk in the first days after the storm because trucks could not reach them in time due to impassable roads.

“It’s really our livelihood,†Hutichnson said. “If our cows are not milked, they are no longer good.”

The US Department of Agriculture gave the green light on Tuesday for a rule change that allows many families to access food stamps even though under no…

Even though electricity slowly returned to most of the parish, the generators needed to pump the milk worked steadily during the 2-3 weeks the farmers were without power. This brought another layer of added stress when the generators inevitably failed or fuel was hard to find.

Now Hutchinson has said they have plenty of fences to fix and trees to remove, barns and sheds to fix “or clean up what’s left of them.”

Twice a day, we’ll send you the headlines of the day. Register today.

Fruit and vegetable growers have also been affected by Ida, said Brian Breaux of the Louisiana Farm Bureau. Many growers use greenhouses, which are sensitive to high winds. Then there is the problem of finding housing for the seasonal workers who harvest the crops.

“We had an issue where some of our workers’ quarters were damaged by the storm,†Breaux said. “It has been a chore to find places for our workers. In the hardest hit areas, many rooms have been set aside for those responsible for cleaning up the electricity and debris.”

For days after Hurricane Ida ravaged Louisiana, a mass of pent-up water and broken debris swirled through the usually tranquil swamp …

Producers who have suffered damage may have crop insurance, but Breaux said most producers of agricultural products do not.

“These growers, especially fruit and vegetable growers, normally take it on the chin,†Breaux said. “A lot of the time it’s normally forgotten souls.”

Natalie Faust Jones, of Faust Farms in Amite City, is one such producer. She does not have crop insurance and does not know any other farmer who does.

She estimates that 50% of their fall harvest is a total waste.

In addition to strawberries, for which the region is known, Faust Farms grows eggplant, peppers, cabbage, and hydroponic lettuce.

“Strawberries are our biggest harvest,†Jones said. “Thank goodness we didn’t have any in the ground yet.”

Instead, his eggplants were severely beaten, pummeled by Ida’s merciless winds.

“Looks like someone took a shotgun and shot it because there are holes in the leaves,†she said. “It’s too late in the game to say ‘go replant’. So whatever we lose, it will only be a loss.”

Stacie Crain’s power faltered and died in her Hammond home around 8 p.m. the night Hurricane Ida hit Tangipahoa Parish.

About two-thirds of the state’s fruit and vegetable production is in Florida parishes, according to Agriculture and Forestry Commissioner Mike Strain.

It is difficult to measure Ida’s economic impact on agriculture until harvest, he said. It depends in part on the evolution of the weather in the coming weeks.

In the meantime, he described a promising network of “farmers helping farmers,†with organizations across the country donating hay, feed, supplies, fuel and fence posts. Thanks to “everyone working together, it really makes a huge, huge difference,” he said.

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An Open Letter to Anyone Visiting a Buffalo Pizza Place Today https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/an-open-letter-to-anyone-visiting-a-buffalo-pizza-place-today/ Fri, 04 Aug 2023 13:52:46 +0000 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/an-open-letter-to-anyone-visiting-a-buffalo-pizza-place-today/ Dear anyone going to a pizzeria in western New York today, It’s finally Super Bowl Sunday. It’s hard to believe that the following Monday isn’t a holiday. Even though this year will be even more difficult for Bills fans, because it seemed like the year to finally win it all (I know, I know, 13 […]]]>

Dear anyone going to a pizzeria in western New York today,

It’s finally Super Bowl Sunday. It’s hard to believe that the following Monday isn’t a holiday. Even though this year will be even more difficult for Bills fans, because it seemed like the year to finally win it all (I know, I know, 13 seconds…), many of us will still spend time with our family and friends at Big Game Nights all over Western New York tonight.

What’s the thing that almost everyone gets for Super Bowl Sunday? Well, two things, actually.

Pizza and wings.

Here in Buffalo, it’s not a real big game party without pizza and wings. Sure, everyone has snacks, beer, soft drinks, dips and other goodies – but pizza and wings are essential for Western New York when it comes to food. a real Super Bowl party.

But if you’re ordering pizza and wings today from a pizzeria in western New York, be sure to be very patient and courteous to the workers who go to work for the big game today.

There will literally be dozens, if not hundreds, of orders at Buffalo pizzerias today, and it’s safe to say that some chaos will ensue at those pizzerias. Trying to get people in and out with their orders; keep track of all the different commands (some of the most important); and of course, make sure all food is hot, fresh and up to standard.

Don’t be rude. Don’t be impatient. Don’t expect perfection either. If you’ve ever worked in the restaurant business, you know how exhausting it can be, and on a day like this, it’s even harder.

I feel for all the pizza workers today, and those who work at Wegmans and Tops today as well. People who forget last minute items or decide to grab their fries and drinks on the day of the big game. Grocery stores will also be crowded.

Let’s all have fun, but remember to be courteous and above all, patient. Also, if you haven’t ordered your food yet (from noon on Sunday), be sure to place that order as soon as possible.

The 40 Best Pizza Places in Western New York

Buffalo’s best pizzerias!

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From product innovations to major recalls, Stacker studied what has happened in food history every year since 1921, according to news and government sources.

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To find the best beer in every state and Washington DC, Stacker analyzed January 2020 data from BeerAdvocate, a website that collects user scores for real-time beer. BeerAdvocate makes its decisions by compiling consumer ratings for all 50 states and Washington DC and applying a weighted ranking to each. The weighted ranking pulls the beer towards the middle of the list based on the number of ratings it has and is intended to allow lesser-known beers to increase their ranking. Only beers with at least 10 ratings should be considered; we’ve gone a step further by only including beers with at least 100 user ratings in our gallery. Keep reading to find out which is the best beer in each of the 50 states and Washington DC.

WATCH: 50 famous memes and what they mean

With the endless number of memes scattered across the internet, it’s hard to keep track. Just when you grasped the meaning of a hilarious meme, it has already become old news and been replaced by something equally enigmatic. Online forums like Tumblr, Twitter, 4chan, and Reddit are responsible for the majority of meme infections, and with constant posting and sharing, finding the source of an original meme is easier said than done. Stacker searched internet resources, pop culture publications and databases such as know your meme to find 50 different memes and what they mean. While the almost self-replicating nature of these vague symbols can become exhausting, memes at their core can also bring people together, as long as they have access to the internet.
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Customers flock to the Carlton Strawberry Farm – Cloquet Pine Journal https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/customers-flock-to-the-carlton-strawberry-farm-cloquet-pine-journal/ Thu, 03 Aug 2023 13:50:51 +0000 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/customers-flock-to-the-carlton-strawberry-farm-cloquet-pine-journal/ Customers flock to the Carlton Strawberry Farm – Cloquet Pine JournalCARLTON — Long before Spectrum Farm Strawberries in Carlton opened its rows of berries to eager pickers at 9 a.m., a line of cars stretched down Carlton County Road 4 in anticipation of another day of berry picking on Wednesday July 13. Spectrum Farm Strawberries, located about four miles west of Hay Lake, is in […]]]> Customers flock to the Carlton Strawberry Farm – Cloquet Pine Journal

CARLTON — Long before Spectrum Farm Strawberries in Carlton opened its rows of berries to eager pickers at 9 a.m., a line of cars stretched down Carlton County Road 4 in anticipation of another day of berry picking on Wednesday July 13.

Spectrum Farm Strawberries, located about four miles west of Hay Lake, is in its fifth berry picking season after forming a tradition with the purchase of Finke’s Berry Farm in 2017.

The farm celebrated its opening day for this year’s season on July 6, and since then customers have flocked to take advantage of the short window to get fresh strawberries.

“Someone told me we had about 400 cars, and it turned out to be a line about a mile long,” Spectrum Farm Strawberries co-owner Steve Schulstrom said in an interview. Monday, July 11. “So there were a lot of people. Everyone came up and everyone picked up in the fields in about 20 minutes. Everyone got the berries they were looking for. It’s been a really good year.

As soon as they arrive at the farm, customers are greeted by employees wearing red aprons, who guide them to where they will pick. Containers to transport the strawberries, priced at $4 a pound, are available for purchase on site, or customers can bring their own from home.

Experienced berry picker Stacy White of Duluth had an old ice cream bucket full of berries brought from her home after spending little time introducing the tradition to the next generation of her family.

Berry pickers search for fresh strawberries among rows of Spectrum Farm Strawberries on Wednesday July 13 in Carlton.

Jake Przytarski / Cloquet Pine Journal

“I was picking strawberries with my kids in the ’90s, and now I’m picking strawberries with my grandkids,” White said. “They love strawberries, and it’s so fun for them to see where they actually grow.”
The days to take advantage of the strawberry picking season are numbered and will probably only last one to two weeks longer. According to Schulstrom, the season usually only lasts three weeks, as temperatures and rainfall dictate its length.

Schulstrom went on to report that the season has been going well so far, especially compared to last season’s drought conditions which left a very short window to pick the fruit.

Employees give instructions

Spectrum Farm Strawberries employees assist customers Wednesday, July 13 at Carlton.

Jake Przytarski / Cloquet Pine Journal

“This year, we did pretty well. At first it was quite warm, but it only lasted a few days… We had good rainfall and everything is fine, so until we run out of berries, we will be picking berries. I’m planning another, I’d say 12-14 days,” Schulstrom said Monday.

With the berry-picking schedule constantly changing, Schulstrom said those who want to come to the farm visit Spectrum Farm Strawberries.

Facebook page

for the latest updates, or call their hotline at 218-389-6265.

Customers pick strawberries

Berry pickers look to fill their buckets at Spectrum Farm Strawberries on Wednesday, July 13 in Carlton.

Jake Przytarski / Cloquet Pine Journal

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Orie Schrock | Obituaries | Goshen News https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/orie-schrock-obituaries-goshen-news/ https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/orie-schrock-obituaries-goshen-news/#respond Wed, 02 Aug 2023 17:05:09 +0000 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/orie-schrock-obituaries-goshen-news/ [ad_1] Orie O. Schrock April 15, 1924 – October 1, 2021 Orie O. Schrock, from Goshen Indiana, passed away on October 1, 2021, at the age of 97. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday October 6 at 4:30 p.m. at East Goshen Mennonite Church, 2019 E. Lincoln Ave, Goshen, EN 46528.. Friends are […]]]>


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April 15, 1924
October 1, 2021

Orie O. Schrock, from Goshen Indiana, passed away on October 1, 2021, at the age of 97. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday October 6 at 4:30 p.m. at East Goshen Mennonite Church, 2019 E. Lincoln Ave, Goshen, EN 46528.. Friends are invited to visit family from 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. before the service. The family requests the wearing of masks.
Orie was born on April 15, 1924 in Goshen, IN to Tobe and Mattie (Miller) Schrock. In the spring of 1931, the family moved to Clarksville, MI. Orie grew up working on the farm with her family. It was drafted in 1945 and went to CPS in Medaryville, IN. After his shift he returned home to the farm. In 1948, Orie moved to Cass Lake, MN. He was a caretaker at the Steamboat Lake Resort. He also taught and preached in various mission churches in Ogema, Loman and Mahnoman regions. He met his first wife, Ruth Stoll, and they were married in Loman on December 20, 1950. Orie was ordained a priest in 1952 at Strawberry Lake Mennonite Church. After living in the Loman area, they moved to Red Lake, Ontario, Canada. They helped in the work of the mission and Orie also worked at the Madsen gold mine. Their four children were born while they lived there.
In 1963, Orie and his family returned to Clarksville, Michigan, where he served as a pastor at Bowne Mennonite Church. In 1969, they moved to Grand Rapids, MI and founded the Mennonite Church in North Park. Orie drove a dump truck for a living. In 1975, Orie and his family moved to Pennsylvania where he served as a pastor at Hersteins Mennonite Church in Schwenksville.
In 1979, Orie and his family moved to Minnesota where he served as the pastor at the Mennonite Leader Church. They have lived in the Staples, Motley and Leader neighborhoods for many years. He worked for various farmers and hauled mail to Motley for 8 years. Each summer he was a counselor at Sand Hill Bile Camp in Fosston, MN, where the children enjoyed “Orie storiesâ€. They also never found his secret hiding place during the annual “Hide and Seek” game. In addition, for many years, Orie disguised himself as Abe Lincoln and pronounced the “Gettysburg Address†at various receptions and schools.
Orie cared for Ruth for many years due to her stroke. In 2001, Ruth passed away. Orie returned to Goshen, IN, where he married Miriam Graber on October 12, 2002. Orie worked for World Missionary Press in New Paris, IN until his retirement at almost 91 in January 2015.
Orie loved and served God throughout her life and wanted to help spread the gospel of Christ around the world. He was a great encouragement and exhorted to always “look for something to do and then do it”, and to always stay busy. Orie attended school until grade 8 when he was needed on the farm. It was a great disappointment for Orie that he couldn’t finish school and contributed greatly to his feelings of inferiority throughout his adult life. So it was a great accomplishment when he was able to get his GED in 1995 at the age of 71. His family celebrated with him.
Orie leaves behind his wife, Miriam, his children, Alan (Pat Keener) of Moorhead, MN, Anna (Dan Pipek) of Staples, MN, Susan (Curt Martin) of Pillager, MN, and Marlin (Cathy Cole) of Waverly , New York. Her stepchildren John (Crissie Musselman) Graber of Goshen, IN, Merlin Graber, Goshen, IN, Millard (Sheila Koch) Graber, Goshen, IN, Carol (Bill Frisbie), Goshen, IN and Galen (Ruth Brenneman) Graber, Wellman, IA, ten grandchildren, fourteen step-grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren, fourteen step-great-grandchildren, Brother Edward of Clarksville, MI and Sister Martha (Virgil) Albrecht of Three Rivers, MI .
He was predeceased by his first wife, Ruth, his great-grandson James Martin, his step-granddaughter Joyce Graber, his great-grandson Joshua Angel, his brother Oscar, his sisters Mae Wenger, Mary Birkey and her little sister Esther.
Memorial contributions can be sent to World Missionary Press, PO Box 120, New Paris, Indiana 46553-0120
Arrangements are with Rieth Rohrer & Ehret Funeral Home and online condolences can be submitted at www.rrefh.com

Published on October 3, 2021

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Montavilla Farmer’s Market begins winter season “East PDX News https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/montavilla-farmers-market-begins-winter-season-east-pdx-news/ Tue, 01 Aug 2023 09:36:18 +0000 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/montavilla-farmers-market-begins-winter-season-east-pdx-news/ [ad_1] INCLUDES A VIDEO THUMBNAIL | Find out why the manager of this East Portland Farmers’ Market calls his regular season “fantasticâ€. Find out about the schedule for their holiday market and when they will be open during the winter … The last day of their “regular” season, the agricultural market of Montavilla is lively, […]]]>


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INCLUDES A VIDEO THUMBNAIL | Find out why the manager of this East Portland Farmers’ Market calls his regular season “fantasticâ€. Find out about the schedule for their holiday market and when they will be open during the winter …

The last day of their “regular” season, the agricultural market of Montavilla is lively, as usual, on this Sunday morning..

Story and photos by David F. Ashton

As the days grow shorter and winter weather sets in, it’s also time for a change of seasons at the Montavilla Farmer’s Market (MFM).

Under very overcast skies, our visit to the MFM on Sunday November 14 was the penultimate week of the regular season every Sunday.

Genevieve Flanagan, from One acre urban property, who grows in the Russell neighborhood, spends time with Lisa Hall, MFM Market Manager.

“Although our regular season ended on the Sunday before Thanksgiving Day, our market isn’t just ‘packing’ for the winter,†commented Lisa Hall, MFM Market Manager.

More information on their upcoming schedule in a moment, please read on…

“It has been a fantastic season for us,†said Hall. East Portland News. “We had about 70 vendors, in total, throughout the season selling everything from strawberries and vegetables, to orchard fruits, animal products – as well as fresh and hot ready-to-eat foods. eat, â€she noted.

Montavilla’s neighbor, Hannah Katibah, shops with seller Chesterfield Wheatley from Lil ‘Starts Plant Nursery.

Another freshly prepared dish is the Pedro Felipe de Mixteca.

One way for her to measure market performance is to count the number of customers who come through their doors. “In the height of summer, we would see about 2,000 people, per market, coming to shop during the four hours we are open,” Hall said. “Now, in the fall, we get between 1,200 and 1,500 per market, which is great for our suppliers!

“Our suppliers tell us they love this market, which is why they keep coming back. They say they value the community, they love customer loyalty, and they love the way customers show up – even when the weather is bad – yes, even when it’s raining aside it there are still people who show up at their businesses. “

Feel like visiting the Montavilla farmer’s market
by viewing our video thumbnail:

?

The “Fill Your Pantry†event on December 12 kicks off the winter season
“December 12 is our ‘Fill Your Pantry’ Day, where we encourage shoppers to ‘stock up’ for the holidays by buying in bulk,†Hall said. “In the December markets, we will see between 40 and 50 sellers.

“Next, December 19 is the Holiday Market, where we will feature craft vendors offering their products, in addition to those selling fresh and prepared foods.”

Montavilla’s neighbor Tim Lang shares freshly cooked food with visiting San Francisco guest Shawn Nichols.

Two Sundays a week, from January
But even the end of the year is not the end of the market season. January marks the start of the MFM’s winter markets – open at the same times – but these take place every other Sunday, Hall informed.

“It won’t be a ‘truck market’ like what was held here a few years ago, it will look like a regular market, but with fewer – around 40 – sellers,†Hall commented. “While our farmers will take a well-deserved rest in the winter and prepare for the next season, most of our market gardeners will still be there all year round. “

Montavilla Farmer’s Market

  • 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. each market day
  • December 12: “Fill your pantry†event
  • December 19: Holiday market
  • Closed on December 26
  • Winter markets January 9 and 23
  • Please follow their COVID-19 coronavirus protocols. It is located on the gravel lot of the 7700 block of SE Stark Street, across from Mr. Plywood. CLICK HERE to see their website.

© 2021 David F. Ashton ~ East Portland News ™

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Laos hopes for economic revival of Chinese railway https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/laos-hopes-for-economic-revival-of-chinese-railway/ Tue, 01 Aug 2023 08:26:16 +0000 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/laos-hopes-for-economic-revival-of-chinese-railway/ [ad_1] Published on: 11/28/2021 – 04:04 Bangkok (AFP) – A new $ 6 billion Chinese-built railway line opens in Laos this week, bringing hopes of an economic boost to the reclusive nation, but experts question the benefits of a project that has seen thousands of farmers evicted from their land. The 414-kilometer (260-mile) highway, due […]]]>


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Published on:

Bangkok (AFP) – A new $ 6 billion Chinese-built railway line opens in Laos this week, bringing hopes of an economic boost to the reclusive nation, but experts question the benefits of a project that has seen thousands of farmers evicted from their land.

The 414-kilometer (260-mile) highway, due to open on Dec. 3, took five years to be built as part of China’s Belt and Road Initiative, which funds infrastructure projects to expand Beijing’s influence in the world.

Struggling strawberry producer Anouphon Phomhacsar is hoping the new railroad will revive his business.

His farm typically produces up to two tonnes of heart-shaped berries per year, but the pandemic has hit the 2021 harvest hard.

It currently takes three to four hours for Phomhacsar to ship his strawberries to Vientiane by road, but he hopes the new railway will cut that delivery time in half.

And he says it will also be easier for tourists to travel to camp under the stars and pick berries.

Laos-China Railway Laurence CHU AFP

“In the future, foreign tourists coming to the farm could number in the tens of thousands,” he told AFP.

The rail route will link the Chinese city of Kunming to the capital of Laos, with big plans for the high-speed train that will eventually cross Thailand and Malaysia to Singapore.

Laos, poor in infrastructure, a reclusive country ruled by Communists of 7.2 million inhabitants, previously had only four kilometers of railroad tracks.

But now red, blue and white high-speed trains will accelerate along the new line to up to 160 km / h (100 mph), crossing 75 tunnels and 167 bridges, stopping at 10 passenger stations.

Economic boost

Although it only recorded dozens of Covid cases until April, Laos’ economy suffered a pandemic – economic growth fell to 0.4% in 2020, the lowest level in three decades, according to the World Bank.

Hopes of a rebound in 2021 have been dashed – Laos has locked itself down as it has recorded around 70,000 infections in the past eight months.

And while the railroad could boost tourism, freight and agriculture, according to a World Bank report, the government needs to undertake substantial reforms, including improving border clearance processes.

“The new railway is a major investment that has the potential to boost the Lao economy and allow the country to take advantage of its geographical position in the heart of mainland Southeast Asia,” AFP told AFP. Sombath Southivong, Infrastructure Specialist at the World Bank.


The 414-kilometer road, slated to open on December 3, took five years to build under China's initiative
The 414-kilometer highway, scheduled to open on Dec. 3, took five years to build under China’s $ 1 trillion Belt and Road initiative. STR LAO NATIONAL TV / AFP

The tourism industry is in desperate need of a pick-up after the pandemic caused an 80% drop in international travelers in 2020 – 4.7 million foreign tourists visited the year before.

Young pre-pandemic nomads have crowded onto buses in Vientiane for the four-hour journey to adventure capital Vang Vieng – a journey that will now take around an hour by train.

The city, which has a former CIA airstrip, was known for backpackers who misbehaved at jungle parties before it became an eco-tourism destination.

But kayaks, river rafts, zip lines and hot air balloons have emptied of late.


While the railroad could boost tourism, freight and agriculture, according to a World Bank report, the government needs to undertake substantial reforms, including improving border clearance processes.
While the railroad could boost tourism, freight and agriculture, according to a World Bank report, the government needs to undertake substantial reforms, including improving border clearance processes. STR LAO NATIONAL TV / AFP

Inthira – a boutique hotel nestled on the banks of the Nam Song River – has gone from full occupancy to just a trickle of domestic travelers on weekends, chief executive Oscar Tality said.

Tality hopes the railroad and reduced travel times will give the industry a boost.

“Along the way, people will see wonderful mountain views and cross bridges and tunnels. It will be a wonderful journey for those who take the train,” Tality told AFP.

White elephant?

Despite local optimism, some observers in Laos are concerned about the long-term viability of the project.

“The problem for Laos is whether its economy (…) its private sector is able to take advantage of this transport system,” Greg Raymond, professor at the Australian National University, told AFP.


Laos' tourism industry hopes for a boost from the railroad, which will significantly reduce journey times
Laos’ tourism industry hopes for a boost from the railroad, which will significantly reduce journey times STR LAO NATIONAL TV / AFP

Two-thirds of Laotians live in rural villages and work hard on the land, and the minimum wage is around $ 116 per month.

“When you look at the juxtaposition of this ultramodern railroad and the countryside it traverses, it’s very striking. We wonder if Laos will be the beneficiaries? Raymond said.

The project has already left some 4,400 farmers and villagers in shock after being forced to cede land.

Many faced long delays in receiving compensation or received insufficient amounts, the Lao Human Rights Movement said in a report.

“The compensation rate is very low. If you ask the villagers to move, how can they afford new land? Laotian MP Vilay Phommixay told parliament in June last year.

But for others, it’s all on board.

“There is great anticipation … there is a source of pride for the people of Laos,” Tality said.

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Farms in the area are trying to resist the rain https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/farms-in-the-area-are-trying-to-resist-the-rain/ https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/farms-in-the-area-are-trying-to-resist-the-rain/#respond Fri, 28 Jul 2023 03:28:23 +0000 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/farms-in-the-area-are-trying-to-resist-the-rain/ [ad_1] No living thing can survive without water. But an abundance of it can wreak havoc on plants, especially crops that farmers depend on for their income. Almost eight inches of rain fell on Greenfield between July 1 and July 14, and the rest of Franklin and Hampshire counties were not spared from the heavy […]]]>


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No living thing can survive without water. But an abundance of it can wreak havoc on plants, especially crops that farmers depend on for their income.

Almost eight inches of rain fell on Greenfield between July 1 and July 14, and the rest of Franklin and Hampshire counties were not spared from the heavy rainfall. Local farmers said the rainfall is just one more hurdle to overcome and is the opposite of another ordeal – drought.

Ryan Voiland, owner of Red Fire Farm in Montague with his wife Sarah, said the rain had caused major problems.

“Things were going pretty well this year until about 10 days ago, when it started to rain torrentially again and again,†he said Thursday afternoon. “He went from looking great on the pitch to being oversaturated.”

Voiland said its fields with less than perfect drainage are in big trouble. He estimated that a third of his fall carrots, planted while they were still germinating, are underwater and will need to be abandoned.

“It’s like a swamp right now,†he said, adding that many of his tomato plants are damaged.

Farm properties in Sunderland and Granby are experiencing similar problems, Voiland added.

He said that outside of harvest, heavy rains create a lot of mud, which hinders tractors, and large puddles make it impossible to destroy weeds. He also said his irrigation pond is overflowing and his irrigation pumps near the Connecticut River were submerged in water when the river overflowed. He said he thought the pumps could be fixed, but it’s yet another project added to the list.

Voiland said the rain would likely cause a yield reduction of 5 to 10 percent.

“There is no insurance that will help us with this sort of thing,” he said.

David Wissemann, who runs Warner Farm in Sunderland with his father, Mike, said his business has probably suffered less than others in the area, but heavy rains have delayed the harvest of some crops.

“When it’s super dry, you can always add water – you can’t take it off,†he said.

Warner Farm’s primary fall crop is the Corn Maze, in reference to the 8-acre Mike’s Maze which is a popular fall attraction. The maze was affected because its design carved into the cornfield by Rob Stouffer, of Precision Mazes in Lee’s Summit, Mo. – was delayed for at least a week. Her family was literally able to weather the storm because in 2018 they acquired the Millstone Farm Market across the street. This provided a constant, unaffected stream of income.

The heavy precipitation can be attributed to both the passage of Hurricane Elsa and general tropical humidity from the south, according to Bill Leatham, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Norton. He said the rain had hit much of New England, although the southeastern part of Massachusetts actually experiences a mild drought, as the west side of a storm typically contains more precipitation, while the east side is experiencing more wind.

Leslie Harris, the manager of the Quonquont farm in Whately, said at the start of the season she expected a drought similar to last year, when just over three inches fell in Greenfield during the first two weeks of July.

“I was starting to worry because (the property is) not irrigated,†she said. “And now all of a sudden the rain won’t stop, it seems. The good news is that our rain barrels (which she had from last year’s drought) are full, if it ever stops.

Harris said the heavy rainfall puts a lot of stress on all plants, although more mature trees do better because they have longer roots. The orchard cultivates peaches, strawberries and blueberries. She said harvesting is a wet task but “it’s better than having a drought”.

Voiland, Wissemann and Harris said perhaps the biggest concern about excess water is the disease and the plagues it can cause. Voiland carefully searches for fungal and bacterial diseases that can easily be spread.

Wissemann said aquatic mold can devastate crops like tomatoes, peppers, melons, cucumbers and winter squash, and he’s started to see a certain guy infiltrating some of his fields. But, he said, Warner Farm is not an organic operation, which means workers can spray chemicals to keep mold at bay. Organic farms, however, cannot do this and “nothing organic can stop it.”

Harris said his biggest challenge was to avoid the diseases that humidity can cause in plants.

“You can’t control the weather, so you get around it,†she said. “I hope things come together and we always have a great harvest season. “

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A guide to Lambasingi, a beautiful hill station and weekend getaway in Andhra https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/a-guide-to-lambasingi-a-beautiful-hill-station-and-weekend-getaway-in-andhra/ https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/a-guide-to-lambasingi-a-beautiful-hill-station-and-weekend-getaway-in-andhra/#respond Wed, 26 Jul 2023 07:36:02 +0000 https://strawberryfieldsstorytellers.com/a-guide-to-lambasingi-a-beautiful-hill-station-and-weekend-getaway-in-andhra/ [ad_1] If you want a peaceful and quiet vacation with the ability to witness breathtaking views and click lots of photos, then Lambasingi is the place for you. Lambasingi is a small village located in Chintapalli mandal of the district of Visakhapatnam in Andhra Pradesh. The hamlet is nestled in the picturesque mountains of the […]]]>


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If you want a peaceful and quiet vacation with the ability to witness breathtaking views and click lots of photos, then Lambasingi is the place for you.

Lambasingi is a small village located in Chintapalli mandal of the district of Visakhapatnam in Andhra Pradesh. The hamlet is nestled in the picturesque mountains of the Eastern Ghats. Located about 1000 meters above sea level, Lambasingi offers visitors a pleasant climate, a view of dense forests and a peaceful weekend. Considering that several parts of Andhra Pradesh experience very high temperatures during the summer, a trip to Lambasingi can be a break.

Lambasingi, unlike other hill stations, is not yet overly commercial. Although one can find shops selling spices, tea and coffee, the usual activity of a hill station might be lacking, unlike in Ooty and Kodaikanal. That’s good news for those looking for a quiet getaway away from the hustle and bustle of the cities. As tourists flock here on weekends, Lambasingi once again becomes a quiet village on weekdays.

The village is located approximately 107 kilometers from the Visakhapatnam Airport and is not too far a destination if you plan to get off by car. The hairpin bends and the view of the misty mountains make driving enjoyable. If you plan to use public transport, buses and taxis can be used to reach Lambasingi from Vizag.

While Lambasingi offers tourists a few resorts and hotels that have recently sprung up in the hill station, if you can befriend a local resident, you can find host families. Lately, groups have also started offering tents for tourists to stay overnight. For anything between Rs 1,500 and Rs 2,500 you can make a deal for a tent, food and also an early morning guided hike. Some packages also include a visit to a strawberry farm, where you can go strawberry picking.

Although Lambasingi has no entertainment options after the sun goes down, you can try some local cuisine and go to bed early as no visit to Lambasingi is complete without a hike to the magnificent viewpoint. There are a few routes you can take to get to the viewpoint, there is one that claims to be the shortest way to the top of the hill. People usually get up as early as 4 a.m., hoping to watch the sunrise from the vantage point. Although the hike is strenuous and tiring, once you reach the top you will be amazed to witness the sunrise. Just pray that it isn’t a cloudy morning to make sure you have the view that makes the display picture perfect!

If you are the type to look for party, nightlife and entertainment then Lambasingi is not your kind of place. If you want a peaceful and quiet vacation with the possibility of witnessing breathtaking views and plenty of photos, then Lambasingi is the place for you. Two days would be enough for Lambasingi. Depending on the season, you can also buy dragon fruit, pineapples, fresh apples from the farms. You will also find coffee and pepper for sale.

Thanks to the connectivity issues, if you are planning a trip to Lambasingi, you will have a lot of “time for me” and, of course, the opportunity to spend some quality time with your loved ones. However, be sure to wear masks, maintain a safe distance, and practice hand hygiene as the COVID-19 pandemic is not over yet.

TNM visited Lambasingi, watch this video:

LILY: Varkala to Vattakanal: 10 destinations in South India for a romantic weekend

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